Category Archives: Tableau

Download data to predict gender using first name (US data)

Download US American first names and initials to predict gender sex 1Do you have data with just first names or even just first initials but no information on the person’s gender/sex? If you would like better insights on your customers, based on whether they are likely male or female, then this data download is a great way to maximize your ROI! Download it today and begin using it to tailor your messaging and improve future communications.

There are three licenses available for this data- individual, corporate and corporate for multi-company consumers. The individual version is available free (with discount code) for a limited time. Simply select the Individual license for purchase and use discount code discfreepers at the checkout page- this will deduct $3.99 from your purchase price.

The primary table in this data download is First names by Freakalytics with 5164 rows (distinct names and common misspellings). You can use this data to guess if someone is a male or female based on their first name or find the probability that they are male or female based on their first name.

Here is the column information and simple summaries for this table:

Data Column Max Min Average Median Mode
Name mixed case Zulma Aaron N/A N/A James
Most likely gender Male Female N/A N/A Female
Rank Overall 4,019 1 2354 2397 4019
Male Probability 100% 0% 22% 0% 0%
Female Probability 100% 0% 78% 100% 100%
Count Either Gender 99,989 32 1,079 127 32
Male Count 99,671 0 524 0 0
Female Count 83,718 0 555 64 32
Male Probability Within 3.68% 0.00% 0.08% 0.01% 0.00%
Female Probability Within 2.92% 0.00% 0.02% 0.00% 0.00%
Male Rank 1,054 1 584 608 1,054
Female Rank 3,052 1 1,825 2,131 3,052
Name first initial Z A N/A N/A J
Name upper case ZULMA AARON N/A N/A JAMES

The top few rows from this table (as a snapshot of the data in Excel 2003 format and in text):

Download US American first names and initials to predict gender sex 1

Access this valuable data download here.

Free Webinar—Quick & dirty analysis with Tableau
in 13 lucky steps!

6_Manual_Rearrange_Items_Freakalytics_1_Tableau
July 31st, 2013, Noon Pacific, 3 PM Eastern, 8 PM London
 
 
So much data, so little time!
–Stephen McDaniel
Co-founder of Freakalytics

 
 
Synopsis
Let’s face it: in the daily world of work, you often are asked to provide an answer to a new problem in less than a day. Of course, your boss tends to forget about the other three project deadlines you are currently facing, so you really have only 10 or 20 minutes to squeeze in a quick and dirty analysis.

If this sounds familiar to you, this webinar will walk you through the thirteen flexible steps that can take you from being clueless to looking smart with Tableau in just a few minutes. Hopefully you’ll be able to obtain enough information to come up with ideas for an e-mail update or talking points for the unexpected meeting that is looming large over your day, showing your boss and colleagues that you can deliver great results in time to be useful.

So, if you’re already a user of Tableau, this webinar will guide you in the critical path of many analyses in Tableau. If you are totally new to Tableau, you can see the possibilities of what you can accomplish in a short amount of time, once you get started and practice these techniques.
 
 
A preview of the first few steps

1 What question will you examine?

1_PostIts_Flickr_Sources_CC_License

 

Okay, in reality this step might take hours or even days! But let’s assume you have your question, and if it is complex, break it down into several, simpler questions.

2 Grab the closest, readily available dataset Continue reading

Free Webinar—Visual Analytics Best Practices
Why Can’t You See My Point?!?

201306-Freakalytics-Nuclear-Power-602

You can have brilliant ideas,
but if you can’t get them across,
your ideas won’t get you anywhere.

-Lee Iacocca

 

The webinar is past but you can watch the recording and view the slides below.
This post is currently being updated with the slides and videos.

Why do visual analytics best practices matter?

Why can’t people see your point when you present data-oriented presentations?

Whether you are using big data, small data or summarized data that has been prepared for you, this webinar will explore these vital questions. If you are concerned with getting the most from your data, this complimentary webinar is a great step in learning how to clearly communicate with people as they make better informed decisions in the hectic world of modern business.

Synopsis
Are you clearly communicating the message that you want to deliver from your data? If you’re tired of your tables and charts being “good enough”, learn some tips and tricks to help make them great! We’ll demonstrate how choosing the right table, chart and metrics to answer the question at hand and how to simplify your visuals for maximum impact. Regardless of whether you use Excel, SAS, R, PowerPoint, Qlikview, Tableau, Business Objects, Cognos, Microstrategy or most any other analytics tool for your analysis, you will benefit from this thought-provoking presentation.

For everyone who joined, thanks for your support and participation during the Q&A!

20130626 webinar comments 2
 
 
 
Chat comments at the end of the webinar
20130626_webinar_comments_smaller

Click here for the video and presentation Continue reading

Joyful or informative charts? Best practices in visual analytics

Small_packed_bubble_chartStephen Few, noted visual analytics expert and the original inspiration for our work in the field, recently wrote about criticisms of best data visualizations practices. In particular, Amanda Cox of the New York Times said, “There’s a strand of the data viz world that argues that everything could be a bar chart. That’s possibly true but also possibly a world without joy.” And Nathan Yau of Flowing Data wrote, “in visualization you eventually learn that there’s more to the process than efficient graphical perception and avoidance of all things round. Design matters, no doubt, but your understanding of the data matters much more.” These are both people who have a body of work that I admire but I am also surprised at these comments.

This discussion reminds me of a similar problem in marketing and web analytics. Generating traffic that leads to sales is good. Eventually, someone finds a way to generate traffic that leads to not many new sales, but management is misled to think this must be good since traffic leads to sales. This is similar to “look, this chart is beautiful“, but hard to interpret or understand. So, while we delivered fun graphs, minimal information is shared. This may be good for traffic, but not so much for higher sales.

I suspect that part of this recent criticism can be traced back to Stephen’s recent criticism of Tableau, “Tableau Veers from the Path“. In it, he mentions a new graph type in Tableau, packed bubble charts and contrasts them with bar charts. This is an example of the “avoidance of all things circular”. Is Stephen truly anti-joy@f16 Will an example show him to be wrong@f17 Let’s give it a try and you can judge for yourself.

Here’s a packed bubble chart example Continue reading

Avoid flatline charts—visual analytics best practices

Balancing analysis of multiple years by filtering through the same month/day as today
 
 
Topics in this example
 
1) With a line chart, by placing Year(Order Date) on the Color shelf and Month(Date) on the columns, you can easily compare multiple years on the same pane of the graph. Just use Running Totals from the Quick Table Calculation dialog.
 
2) If this were real-world data, you would likely want to keep data through today; otherwise, prior years would likely be much higher since they are based on a full month while this year’s latest month is partially complete, unless it is the last day of the month!
 
3) By creating a calculated field that can check if the month/day is before today’s month/day and placing it on the filter shelf and selecting True, you can keep year-to-date data Continue reading

Quick tutorial on reference lines, bands and distributions – visual analytics best practices

The following article features Tableau 6

Reference lines, bands or distributions may be added to your views to emphasize particular values or areas that may be useful in interpreting your data. In particular, when comparing multiple groups or categories of data, reference lines and bands provide immediate feedback on the overall differences between the groups.

Reference lines

Reference lines are vertical or horizontal lines displayed on your view that mark requested values such as average, median, minimum, maximum, sum, total and constants (such as a line that separates the data points as being above or below a target). They can be added on any continuous axis.

1) Open the Sample – Coffee Chain (Access) data source included by default with Tableau 6

2) Place Sales on the Columns shelf and change the aggregate to Average.

3) Place Product on the Rows shelf,
     State and Date on the Level of Detail shelf
     and format
Date to ‘MMMM YYYY’.

Continue reading

Wimbledon winners dashboard

Wimbledon winners by country and player

 
The compact form of this example was also featured on The Guardian DataBlog, the third most popular online newspaper in the world. All four of the Wimbledon examples on this website were created in less than two hours using Tableau- this includes three distinct perspectives on the Wimbledon winners data and two of them in a compact design for use on the Guardian web site.

 

Quick reference for graph and dashboard design

Freakalytics has published to Amazon, Android and iPhone a new quick reference for building better graphs and dashboards. Note that the iPhone and Android apps are now released: search for “Rapid Dashboards” on the iPhone (click here to open it in App Store web site) and “Rapid Graphs and Dashboards” on the Android application stores (click here to go to it in the Android Market web site.)

The Amazon version, “Rapid Dashboards Reference Card”, has all 64 tips readily available on four full-color, laminated pages. The card serves as a handy reference for yourself, your team and even your business audience during design meetings.

iPhone preview, also on Android
Page 1 Excerpt, buy it at Amazon
Page 3 Excerpt, buy it at Amazon

Over the coming year, we will post a sampling of the tips from the reference card on our site. Freakalytics, helping you take your graphs and dashboards from good to great!

Bullet charts and simple enhancements to maximize value

Bullet charts were added to Tableau in version 5.1. They are an original idea designed and advocated for by Stephen Few, at the University of California at Berkeley. The bullet chart is intended to enable easy examination of attainment relative to a target for categorical items.
 
According to Stephen’s original specification, “The bullet graph was developed to replace the meters and gauges that are often used on dashboards. Its linear and no-frills design provides a rich display of data in a small space, which is essential on a dashboard.

I have shown the standard Tableau bullet chart and a wide array of variants in our public training course. Based on extensive attendee feedback, I will share how just a few minutes spent enriching your bullet charts will yield powerful enhancements for your dashboard audience.
 
Continue reading

SAT performance versus school spending dashboard

This dashboard provides a comparison of per student spending with performance on the SAT exam based on the 2009 New Jersey Report Card data. DFGs are based on economic and demographic data. These are assigned by the New Jersey State Department of Education.

This work was created in collaboration with Bob Morrison of Quadrant Arts Education Research. Bob has extensive experience with helping school systems measure educational results related to how and where funds are spent. I have a great admiration for Bob as a passionate advocate for growing both music and arts education. Bob has expertise in advocating on behalf of students around the many ways that music and arts education can engage students and improve their academic performance.
Continue reading