Category Archives: Tableau–Data

Download data to predict gender using first name (US data)

Download US American first names and initials to predict gender sex 1Do you have data with just first names or even just first initials but no information on the person’s gender/sex? If you would like better insights on your customers, based on whether they are likely male or female, then this data download is a great way to maximize your ROI! Download it today and begin using it to tailor your messaging and improve future communications.

There are three licenses available for this data- individual, corporate and corporate for multi-company consumers. The individual version is available free (with discount code) for a limited time. Simply select the Individual license for purchase and use discount code discfreepers at the checkout page- this will deduct $3.99 from your purchase price.

The primary table in this data download is First names by Freakalytics with 5164 rows (distinct names and common misspellings). You can use this data to guess if someone is a male or female based on their first name or find the probability that they are male or female based on their first name.

Here is the column information and simple summaries for this table:

Data Column Max Min Average Median Mode
Name mixed case Zulma Aaron N/A N/A James
Most likely gender Male Female N/A N/A Female
Rank Overall 4,019 1 2354 2397 4019
Male Probability 100% 0% 22% 0% 0%
Female Probability 100% 0% 78% 100% 100%
Count Either Gender 99,989 32 1,079 127 32
Male Count 99,671 0 524 0 0
Female Count 83,718 0 555 64 32
Male Probability Within 3.68% 0.00% 0.08% 0.01% 0.00%
Female Probability Within 2.92% 0.00% 0.02% 0.00% 0.00%
Male Rank 1,054 1 584 608 1,054
Female Rank 3,052 1 1,825 2,131 3,052
Name first initial Z A N/A N/A J
Name upper case ZULMA AARON N/A N/A JAMES

The top few rows from this table (as a snapshot of the data in Excel 2003 format and in text):

Download US American first names and initials to predict gender sex 1

Access this valuable data download here.

Free Webinar—Quick & dirty analysis with Tableau
in 13 lucky steps!

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July 31st, 2013, Noon Pacific, 3 PM Eastern, 8 PM London
 
 
So much data, so little time!
–Stephen McDaniel
Co-founder of Freakalytics

 
 
Synopsis
Let’s face it: in the daily world of work, you often are asked to provide an answer to a new problem in less than a day. Of course, your boss tends to forget about the other three project deadlines you are currently facing, so you really have only 10 or 20 minutes to squeeze in a quick and dirty analysis.

If this sounds familiar to you, this webinar will walk you through the thirteen flexible steps that can take you from being clueless to looking smart with Tableau in just a few minutes. Hopefully you’ll be able to obtain enough information to come up with ideas for an e-mail update or talking points for the unexpected meeting that is looming large over your day, showing your boss and colleagues that you can deliver great results in time to be useful.

So, if you’re already a user of Tableau, this webinar will guide you in the critical path of many analyses in Tableau. If you are totally new to Tableau, you can see the possibilities of what you can accomplish in a short amount of time, once you get started and practice these techniques.
 
 
A preview of the first few steps

1 What question will you examine?

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Okay, in reality this step might take hours or even days! But let’s assume you have your question, and if it is complex, break it down into several, simpler questions.

2 Grab the closest, readily available dataset Continue reading

Bullet charts and simple enhancements to maximize value

Bullet charts were added to Tableau in version 5.1. They are an original idea designed and advocated for by Stephen Few, at the University of California at Berkeley. The bullet chart is intended to enable easy examination of attainment relative to a target for categorical items.
 
According to Stephen’s original specification, “The bullet graph was developed to replace the meters and gauges that are often used on dashboards. Its linear and no-frills design provides a rich display of data in a small space, which is essential on a dashboard.

I have shown the standard Tableau bullet chart and a wide array of variants in our public training course. Based on extensive attendee feedback, I will share how just a few minutes spent enriching your bullet charts will yield powerful enhancements for your dashboard audience.
 
Continue reading